Questions to Ask a Prospective Background Screening Partner

Following are six questions that an employer should ask prospective background screening partners to understand their concern for quality and compliance.

When records are found in the “national” criminal records database, do you verify them with the originating court before reporting them to the employer? Are there extra charges for any verifications?

Imperative always verifies records identified in our multijurisdictional criminal records database before reporting them to our clients to ensure that the information is accurate and up to date. There is no charge for these verifications beyond our quoted package price.

When selecting counties in which to conduct criminal searches, how many years of previous addresses do you include?

Imperative’s standard lookback period is 10 years at a minimum but clients can ask for a longer lookback period.

Do you include all aliases and spelling variations strongly associated with the individual by the identity research/SSN verification in research for the quoted package price?

Imperative does.

What limitations do you place on reporting convictions?

Imperative reports all convictions, subject to state and local regulations.*

What limitations do you place on reporting deferred adjudication cases? (“Deferred adjudication” means that the individual pleaded guilty or “no contest” to the offense and was given probation. After successful completion of probation, the case may be dismissed by the court.)

Imperative reports all deferred adjudication cases in the past seven years, subject to state and local regulations.*
If the candidate is expected to earn more than $75K per year, Imperative reports all deferred adjudication cases, regardless of age, subject to state and local regulations.*

What limitations do you place on reporting dismissed cases?

Imperative reports all dismissed cases in the past seven years, subject to state and local regulations.*

If the candidate is expected to earn more than $75K per year, Imperative reports dismissed cases, regardless of age, subject to state and local regulations.*

 

*  The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act prohibits reporting of non-conviction information older than seven years, unless the individual’s wages are expected to exceed $75,000 per year, in which case there is no restriction on reporting non-conviction information. Some state and local governments prohibit employers from considering some criminal cases based on age or disposition.